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Product Detail

Complex Trauma Certification Training (CCTP/CCTP-II) Course with Janina Fisher
Online Course
$1,669.95 USD
$999.99
Product Details
Format:
Online Course
Details:
Downloadable/Streaming MP4 Video and MP3 Audio with electronic manual and instructions.
Authors:
JANINA FISHER, PH.D.
BESSEL A VAN DER KOLK, M.D.
Publisher:
PESI Inc.
Copyright:
8/28/2020
CE Available:
Yes, See CE credit tab for complete continuing education details
Product Code:
CRS001292-EVG
Objectives
[+] [-] 046675 - Overcoming Trauma-Related Shame and Self-Loathing with Janina Fisher, Ph.D.
  1. Discriminate the clinical implications of physiological and cognitive contributors to shame.
  2. Determine cognitive-behavioral, ego state, and psychoeducational interventions to address shame in clients.

[+] [-] 047900 - Trauma Defined: Bessel van der Kolk on The Body Keeps the Score
  1. Evaluate how trauma influences the activity of the key areas of the brain and how that dictates behavior patterns in clients.
  2. Articulate the clinical research surrounding the effectiveness of yoga, mindfulness meditation, and theater in healing trauma in clients.

[+] [-] 052599 - Janina Fisher’s Certified Clinical Trauma Professional Training Level 1 (CCTP)

Session I - Trauma and the Body

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of three neurobiologically-based trauma responses and articulate how this information may inform choice of treatment interventions.
  2. Appraise how the somatosensory and autonomic effects of trauma exacerbate symptoms of PTSD in clients.
  3. Assess the role and treatment implications of procedural learning and memory in client presentations.
  4. Incorporate sensorimotor interventions into treatments to decrease symptoms of PTSD in clients.

Session II - Working with the Complications of Dysregulation: Addictions, Eating Disorders, & Self-Destructive Behavior

  1. Assess the relationship between autonomic dysregulation and addictive or self-destructive behavior in relation to assessment and treatment planning.
  2. Articulate the necessity for an integrated treatment of trauma and addictive or suicidal behavior to improve treatment outcomes.
  3. Assess appropriate cognitive-behavioral techniques for treating autonomic dysregulation in clients.
  4. Specify three somatic techniques for regulating autonomic arousal traumatic reactions in clients.

Session III - Working with Traumatic Memory: Principles and Techniques

  1. Determine ‘implicit memory’ and break down its role in post-traumatic stress disorders as it relates to treatment outcomes.
  2. Determine potential complications of addressing narrative memories of traumatic events in treatment sessions.
  3. Specify three interventions that address these complications and put to practical use in session.
  4. Analyze the efficacy of these interventions and distinguish the signs that traumatic memory has been sufficiently processed.

Session IV - Disorganized Attachment and the Traumatic Transference

  1. Outline the root causes of ‘disorganized attachment’ status in children and its clinical implications.
  2. Specify difficulties associated with disorganized attachment for symptom management.
  3. Articulate the role of disorganized attachment on therapeutic transference/countertransference.
  4. Utilize clinical strategies that reduce the complications of traumatic attachment in clients.

Session V - The Role of Dissociation in Trauma-Related Disorders 

  1. Differentiate ‘dissociative states’ versus ‘structural dissociation’ as symptoms of trauma and express their treatment implications.
  2. Evaluate the role of structural dissociation in the treatment of complex trauma and personality disorders.
  3. Diagnose common trauma-related internal conflicts and determine their impact on clients as it relates to case conceptualization.
  4. Utilize mindfulness-based interventions to address resolution of internal conflicts in clients.

Session VI - Working with Shame, Fear and Anger

  1. Articulate the role of shame as an adaptation to trauma and its treatment implications.
  2. Specify the roles of fear and anger as animal defense survival responses to traumatic experiences in clients.
  3. Demonstrate use of both somatic and cognitive interventions to decrease shame, fear and anger in clients.
  4. Determine the role of re-framing in the successful treatment of post-traumatic emotional responses in clients.

[+] [-] 052601 - Janina Fisher’s Certified Clinical Trauma Professional Training Level 2 (CCTP-II)
Session I - Introduction to the Treatment of Dissociation
  1. Determine three signs or symptoms of ‘complex trauma’ as it relates to case conceptualization.
  2. Differentiate dissociative compartmentalization vs. alterations in consciousness.
  3. Apply the Structural Dissociation model as related to clinical treatment.
  4. Identify signs of altered consciousness in traumatized clients.
  5. Discriminate symptoms caused by activity of trauma-related parts.
  6. Discriminate signs of voices found in dissociative disorder versus schizophrenic clients.
  7. Specify therapist interventions that increase patient ability to identify and determine dissociated parts to improve client level of functioning.
  8. Articulate role of mindfulness-based techniques in the treatment of dissociation.
Session II - Increasing Awareness of Dysregulated Parts and Dissociative States
  1. Identify signs of dissociative parts in the therapy hour.
  2. Determine manifestations of parts observed in physical presentation and facial expression in session.
  3. Differentiate characteristics of fight, flight, freeze, attach and submit parts.
  4. Utilize the term ‘blending’ as it applies to structurally dissociated parts for symptom management.
  5. Implement parts language as an intervention in the therapy of dissociative and dysregulated clients.
  6. Determine and analyze dissociative “switching” to improve client engagement.
  7. Utilize clinical strategies to increase internal communication in clients.
  8. Determine the therapist’s role in ‘coaching’ internal dialogue skills to improve treatment outcomes.
Session III - Working with Traumatic Memory in DID:  Implicit Memory and Animal Defense Survival Responses
  1. Determine the distinction between trauma-related explicit memory and implicit memory for purpose of client psychoeducation.
  2. Differentiate implicit memories versus situational emotional responses.
  3. Determine the complications of treating event memories with dissociative disorder clients to improve clinical outcomes.
  4. Utilize clinical strategies to determine the role of animal defense survival responses in dissociative disorders and their relationship to traumatic memory.
  5. Determine characteristic trauma-related internal conflicts found in trauma-related disorders as related to clinical treatment.
  6. Utilize clinical strategies to develop client’s ability to determine internal conflicts as struggles between parts to improve clinical outcomes.
  7. Determine indications and best practices for processing traumatic memories to inform the clinician’s choice of treatment interventions.
  8. Apply the meaning of the term “integration” in the treatment of dissociation as it relates to case conceptualization.
Session IV - Traumatic Attachment and the Treatment of Dissociative Disorders
  1. Apply the concept of “controlling strategies” as a complication of disorganized attachment to improve client level of functioning.
  2. Determine the implications of the controlling strategies in dissociative disorders as related to clinical treatment.
  3. Differentiate the interaction between traumatic attachment and self-destructive behavior to improve treatment outcomes.
  4. Articulate the effects of traumatic/disorganized attachment on the transference.
  5. Demonstrate uses of right brain-to right brain communication to address attachment-related issues.
  6. Utilize interventions for enhancing internal collaboration.
  7. Apply the use of the social engagement system (Porges) to improve client engagement.
  8. Facilitate increased access to states of self-compassion to improve client level of functioning.
Session V - Working with Regression, Aggression and Passivity
  1. Articulate the role of regression and aggression as survival responses to threat.
  2. Analyze personality disorder diagnoses in the light of research on disorganized attachment in clients.
  3. Specify verbal and somatic interventions for working with client dependency as related to clinical treatment.
  4. Demonstrate use of somatic and cognitive interventions to ameliorate devaluing and verbally aggressive behavior.
  5. Articulate the role of depression as an adaptation to trauma.
  6. Specify cognitive and somatic interventions for addressing chronic depressive states in clients.
  7. Determine how to address depression and passivity as a part to improve client level of functioning.
  8. Apply the use of positive re-framing in work with parts of the personality as it relates to treatment outcomes.
Session VI - Integration and Healing
  1. Articulate the traditional view of integration used in dissociative disorders treatment.
  2. Evaluate the complications of a focus on ‘integration’.
  3. Demonstrate interventions for increasing internal communication and cooperation among parts.
  4. Demonstrate internal collaboration as an alternative to traditional models of integration in a clinical setting.
  5. Determine how “healing” has been defined historically as it relates to clinical practice.
  6. Articulate ‘bottom-up’ approaches to healing that have developed over the past ten years.
  7. Determine the ‘negativity bias’ and its effects on psychological health and resilience in clients.
  8. Outline the role of self-acceptance and compassion in the healing process to improve clinical outcomes.

Outline
[+] [-] 046675 - Overcoming Trauma-Related Shame and Self-Loathing with Janina Fisher, Ph.D.
The Neurobiology of Shame
  • The role of shame in traumatic experience
  • Shame as an animal defense survival response
  • Effects of shame on autonomic arousal
Shame’s Evolutionary Purpose
  • Shame and the attachment system
  • Rupture and repair in attachment formation
Making Meaning of Shame
  • Feelings of disgust, degradation, and humiliation are interpreted as “who I am”
  • Cognition and the body
  • Internal working models predict the future and determine our actions
Working from the “Bottom Up”
  • The role of procedural learning and memory
  • Physiological effects of mindful dual awareness
  • Using mindfulness-based techniques to inhibit self-judgment
A New Relationship to the Shame: Acceptance and Compassion
  • Re-contextualizing shame as a younger self or part
  • Bringing our adult capacity to our childhood vulnerability
  • Healing shame through compassionate acceptance
The Social Engagement System and the Healing of Shame
  • Social engagement and the ventral vagal system (Porges)
  • The incompatibility of shame and social engagement
  • The therapist’s own social engagement system as a healing agent

[+] [-] 047900 - Trauma Defined: Bessel van der Kolk on The Body Keeps the Score
The Latest Clinical Research Surrounding:
  • The impact of trauma on brain activity
  • Neurofeedback, EMDR and “body work” on symptom reduction
  • The effectiveness of movement, mindfulness and theater activities in trauma treatment

[+] [-] 052601 - Janina Fisher’s Certified Clinical Trauma Professional Training Level 2 (CCTP-II)
Session I - Principles of Neurobiologically-Informed Trauma Treatment
  1. Articulate the characteristics of neurobiologically-oriented trauma treatment.
  2. Compare neuroplastic therapeutic interventions with traditional talking therapy
  3. Reframe ‘resistance’ as a survival defense response
  4. Demonstrate the ability to re-frame resistance as a ‘survival resource’ in treatment
Session II - Treatment Challenges:  Animal Defense Survival Responses and Internal Struggles
  1. Articulate the signs and symptoms of dissociative compartmentalization
  2. Facilitate mindful observation of dissociated parts of the personality
  3. Discriminate symptoms caused by trauma-related internal conflicts
  4. Demonstrate interventions for resolving internal conflicts
Session III - Treatment Challenges: Chronic Depression and Shame
  1. Articulate the role of shame as an adaptation to trauma or animal defense
  2. Articulate the role of depression as an adaptation to trauma
  3. Demonstrate use of somatic and cognitive interventions to decrease shame and self-loathing
  4. Specify cognitive and somatic interventions for addressing chronic depressive states
Session IV - Treatment Challenges:  Working with Regression and Aggression
  1. Articulate the role of regression and aggression as survival responses to threat
  2. Outline the interactive relationship between the two drives in interpersonal situations
  3. Re-interpret personality disorder diagnoses in the light of this model
  4. Specify verbal and somatic interventions for working with client devaluing and/or dependency
Session V - Treatment Challenges: Traumatic Transference and Rebuilding the Relationship to One’s Self
  1. Interpret the signs of trauma-related self-alienation
  2. Articulate the effects of traumatic attachment and self-alienation on the transference
  3. Demonstrate uses of right brain-to right brain communication to address attachment issues
  4. Utilize interventions for enhancing internal self-compassion
Session VI - Treatment Challenges for the Caregiver:  Vicarious Traumatization
  1. Discriminate the common sources of secondary traumatization in trauma treatment
  2. Articulate the effects of trauma work on the therapist’s nervous system
  3. Identify strategies for reducing therapist vulnerability to vicarious traumatization in session
  4. Outline ethical and effective ways of decreasing the stress of work with high-risk and dissociative clients

Author

JANINA FISHER, PH.D.

Janina Fisher, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and former instructor at The Trauma Center, a research and treatment center founded by Bessel van der Kolk. Known as an expert on the treatment of trauma, Dr. Fisher has also been treating individuals, couples and families since 1980.

She is past president of the New England Society for the Treatment of Trauma and Dissociation, an EMDR International Association Credit Provider, Assistant Educational Director of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, and a former Instructor, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Fisher lectures and teaches nationally and internationally on topics related to the integration of the neurobiological research and newer trauma treatment paradigms into traditional therapeutic modalities.

She is co-author with Pat Ogden of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Interventions for Attachment and Trauma (2015) and author of Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors: Overcoming Internal Self-Alienation (2017) and the forthcoming book, Working with the Neurobiological Legacy of Trauma (in press).

Speaker Disclosures:

Speaker Disclosures: Financial: Janina Fisher is in private practice. She receives a speaking honorarium from PESI, Inc.

Nonfinancial: Janina Fisher has no relevant nonfinancial relationship to disclose.

BESSEL A VAN DER KOLK, M.D.

Bessel A. Van der Kolk, M.D., is a clinician, researcher and teacher in the area of post-traumatic stress. His work integrates developmental, neurobiological, psychodynamic and interpersonal aspects of the impact of trauma and its treatment.

Dr. van der Kolk and his various collaborators have published extensively on the impact of trauma on development, such as dissociative problems, borderline personality and self-mutilation, cognitive development, memory, and the psychobiology of trauma. He has published over 150 peer reviewed scientific articles on such diverse topics as neuroimaging, self-injury, memory, neurofeedback, Developmental Trauma, yoga, theater and EMDR.

He is founder of the Trauma Center in Brookline, Massachusetts and president of the Trauma Research Foundation, which promotes clinical, scientific and educational projects.

His 2014 #1 New York Times best seller, The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Treatment of Trauma, transforms our understanding of traumatic stress, revealing how it literally rearranges the brain’s wiring – specifically areas dedicated to pleasure, engagement, control, and trust. He shows how these areas can be reactivated through innovative treatments including neurofeedback, somatically based therapies, EMDR, psychodrama, play, yoga, and other therapies.

Dr. van der Kolk is the past president of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, and professor of psychiatry at Boston University Medical School. He regularly teaches at conferences, universities, and hospitals around the world.

Speaker Disclosures:

Financial: Bessel van der Kolk is a professor of psychiatry at the Boston University School of Medicine. He receives a speaking honorarium from PESI, Inc.

Nonfinancial: Bessel van der Kolk has no relevant nonfinancial relationship to disclose.
Continuing Education Credits Awarded for Completion of Entire Package
[+] [-] Combined Continuing Education Credit From All Components
Breakdown of Continuing Education Credits by Components
[+] [-] 046675 - Overcoming Trauma-Related Shame and Self-Loathing with Janina Fisher, Ph.D.
[+] [-] 047900 - Trauma Defined: Bessel van der Kolk on The Body Keeps the Score
[+] [-] 052599 - Janina Fisher’s Certified Clinical Trauma Professional Training Level 1 (CCTP)
[+] [-] 052601 - Janina Fisher’s Certified Clinical Trauma Professional Training Level 2 (CCTP-II)
Audience
Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, Case Managers, Addiction Counselors, Marriage & Family Therapists, Nurses, and other Mental Health Professionals, Marriage and Family Therapists, Social Workers and other Mental Health Professionals,
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  • Psychologists
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  • Counselors
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  • Social Workers
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  • Addiction Counselors
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  • Case Managers
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  • Marriage & Family Therapists
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  • Nurses
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  • Psychotherapists
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  • Other Mental Health Professionals
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  • Marriage & Family Therapists